The Mud Racers Association:

 

Mud racing throughout time has been made up of hundreds of small organizations, each with their own ideas of what is or is not allowed in a specific class. While to this day this has worked fine on a smaller scale, the problems of racing on a national level are complicated by these variations in the rules across the country. This coupled with low enforcement of the rules, created more problems when racers traveled to different events, quite often even from town to town, problems that were holding back the growth of the sport.

 

Without some form of standardized rules and format it was very difficult if not impossible for racers to travel to or promoters to hold larger events to bring in racers from other areas. These issues as well as many safety issues, concerned, as well as discouraged many of the racers from searching for more and better competition. The prospect of gaining any national recognition for the sport without some form of sanctioning body and unified rules was near impossible. The prospect of a major race series or sponsors to help support it seemed out of reach. Racers were calling for unity and consistency in the rules, better safety regulations as well as more growth in the sport.

 

The need for an association that would unify mud racing across America was not a new concept by any means, but most will agree that it was a concept whose time had come. Creating a standard set of class rules and safety regulations would allow racers from all parts of the country to compete in National level events without worries of fitting in the class of their choice when they arrive. Once the rules could be standardized, the prospects of offering an event series across the country would be possible.This concept still holds true today.

 

The Mud Racers Association (MRA) is a nationally recognized sanctioning body for many types of mud racing. The Association itself is made up of competitors, promoters and fans of the sport who’s basic philosophy is that by establishing a uniform set of safety guidelines and class rules, a standard can be set throughout the United States that all interested parties can utilize to improve and expand this sport we call mud racing. The following is a brief description of the history of the Mud Racers Association and how it came to be quite possibly the largest sanctioning body for mud racing in the country. Mud racing throughout time has been made up of hundreds of small organizations, each with their own ideas of what is or is not allowed in a specific class.

 

While to this day this has worked fine on a smaller scale, the problems of racing on a national level are complicated by these variations in the rules across the country. This coupled with low enforcement of the rules in an effort to gain more entries, created more problems when racers traveled to different events, quite often even from town to town, problems that were holding back the growth of the sport. Without some form of standardized rules and format it was very difficult if not impossible for racers to travel to or promoters to hold larger events to bring in racers from other areas.

 

These issues as well as many safety issues concerned as well as discouraged many of the racers from searching for more and better competition. The prospect of gaining any national recognition for the sport without some form of sanctioning body and unified rules was near impossible. The prospect of a major race series or sponsors to help support it seemed out of reach. Racers were calling for unity and consistency in the rules, better safety regulations as well as more growth in the sport. With no organizations willing or able to address these issues, the racers themselves started to look to each other for an answer. As with many ideas timing is of the upmost importance.

 

The need for an association that would unify mud racing across America was not a new concept by any means, but most will agree that it was a concept whose time had come. March of 2007 was that time. Throughout the racing season racers discussed the fact that there was a need for unification of the rules if the sport was going to progress. Creating a standard set of class rules and safety regulations would allow racers from all parts of the country to compete in National level events without worries of fitting in the class of their choice when they arrive. Once the rules could be standardized, the prospects of offering an event series across the country would be possible. With the advent of a national series, promoters would have the opportunity to procure sponsors.

 

With these ideas in mind and by racers working together, a web site was created. A name was chosen by the racers around the country and the Mud Racers Association (MRA) became official. It was accepted by all involved to hold an election in the fall of 2007 for the purpose of electing a “Board of Representatives” (Rep’s). Candidates for positions in the association were many; racers from all parts of the country that were interested in bringing the sport together under one banner participated. The election was held and the Mud Racers Association was well on its way with its first of what was to become many annual meetings in Nashville, Tennessee. Nine racers were chosen to be on the board of representatives for terms of one and two years. That’s when the real work began. Rules for “Fast Track” and “Bog/ Pit” racing were developed from hundreds of different sets of rules from dozens of different race organizations and clubs across the United States.

 

By-laws were put into place as well as a Charter and mission statements. Vehicle and track safety were a big concern for the MRA with efforts to maintain and improve these areas a top priority. Membership requirements were set and racers were signing up in an effort to promote the MRA and its concepts. It has been a long and at times a slow process but the MRA has managed to stay on tract in its efforts to unify and promote the sport of mud racing. The Mud Racers Association has come a long ways sense its beginning. With over 300 registered members from more than 28 states continuing their support, it has progressed from writing rules to promoting and establishing a race series in conjunction with host tracks and organizations.

 

They have gone from sanctioning a few events to crowning their first point’s champions in the three “Fast Track” pro classes in 2009. The 2010 season upped the ante with the MRA sanctioning five National Events for the Fast Track series with four of our pro classes and brought to you the first ever MRA sanctioned “Hill n Hole” event series with events in North Carolina, South Carolina and Kansas. In 2011 the Fast Track racing series continued with its five Points Series Events now featuring six Pro classes. The program was also expanded to include as many as three classes of Bog Pit racing at two of those events. With hundreds of competitors, traveling for thousands of miles to take a shot at some of the best competition in the country the “2012 National Points Series” will continue to expand on an already successful series bring everyone some of the best mud racing in the country, for today and into the future.